Why Commercial Mascaras Make Your Eyelashes Gross

Insert UGLY lashes photo here <- wait scratch that!! No one wants to see ugly lashes that are inflamed and red and puffy and itchy…that’s what we’re all trying to get away from, right?

Right!

Most commercial mascaras, no matter if they came from Nordstrom or Wal-Mart are chocked full of nasty ingredients that are known to cause reactions.

Those reactions can range anywhere from:

  • itchy eyes
  • eyelashes that fall out
  • redness
  • styes
  • clogged sebaceous glands
  • eyelashes that grow in funny directions
  • watery eyes
  • and the list goes on and on and on…

So here’s a picture of the way lashes are supposed to look when they’re healthy, and safe mascara is used.  See, isn’t that better than seeing a picture of a stye!  By the way, this picture is taken with our Lash Project mascara…coming July 2014! 🙂

andrea Gluten Free close up eyelashes

You CAN reverse the damage from years of using unsafe, unhealthy commercial mascaras.  Trust me it happened to me!  It doesn’t matter what fancy brand name the mascara is, if you compare it to the $5 tube from Wal-Mart, the ingredients are practically identical.

A few irritating ingredients that you’ll find:

  • Propylene Glycol
  • Sodium Laureth/Lauryl Sulfate
  • Dimethicone
  • Simethicone
  • Parabens
  • Butylene Glycol
  • Sorbic Acid

Now, I could go on and on about the hazards of these ingredients once they enter your skin and mucous membranes.  Because of course, as opposed to eating them (ewww), when you absorb an ingredient through the skin or eyelash follicle it goes directly into your bloodstream, with no filtration system.

However, what I’m talking about is strictly “allergic” reactions.  All of these ingredients (and hundreds more) are well-known to cause skin irritations (or allergies).  These ingredients are in mascaras found in department stores, Ulta, Sephora, and drugstores.

It’s obvious they’re used because they are cheap, and they get the “job done.”

However, they harm your skin, your lash follicle and ultimately your lashes.  It’s no wonder that all the women I speak with across the country, complains that her mascara makes her eyes itch…or her lashes fall out…or her eyes water, etc etc…

Now, one thing to note.  If you see the word “Acid” on a product don’t immediately freak out.  There are many “acids” that are naturally derived from animal or vegetable sources (such as: palmitic acid, stearic acid, myristic acid – all found in coconut oil) – think fatty acids, not prussic acid (or cyanide).  Just a little tidbit for your brilliant brain to remember down the road when doing all that ingredient label reading!! 🙂

Now that you understand why those allergic reactions are happening, it’s easy to understand why here at Red Apple Lipstick we focus on creating products that don’t cause these issues.  It’s simple once you understand the ingredients that cause reactions and the ones that don’t.  We don’t skimp on quality, and we source our ingredients responsibly.

The Lash Project is our mascara.  It’s coming July 2014.  We’ve researched and developed it for five years.  We know you’ll love it.

The Lash Project:

  • will repel sweat and water (we’re not calling it waterproof because waterproof mascaras have gross ingredients, but trust me, ours won’t run -> read about it here) *warning: gross picture of a stye will be there
  • won’t cause spider lashes
  • won’t turn you into a raccoon
  • will help your lashes regain strength and health
  • will reverse damage done by other mascaras
  • will help your lashes to be conditioned
  • won’t make your lashes fall out
  • won’t make your eyes itch, puff, scratch, red

We’ve set up a registration page for The Lash Project release, so that we can keep you up to date on the details of the release sale.  Make sure to get your name on that list now, before it fills up!

http://redapplelipstick.com/shop/eyes/the-lash-project/

I’d love to hear your lash stories below, if you feel like sharing!

 

Andrea Harper

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